Spotted Doves or Pics from my final days in isolation

18 May

Spotted Doves

Dear Reader:

There are many ways to experience the natural and urban environments that we South Australians are lucky enough to have at our disposal. One technique that I have employed, in these days of isolation, is to focus on one animal for a period of time and try to explore some of its behaviours. For obvious reasons, it is best to choose a species that is common to your area. By watching it closely you might discover some interesting traits that you have never noticed before and probably come up with some questions regarding these behaviours.

 

Lovely markings

 

Each morning I scatter out seeds for the Spotted Doves that frequent the trees surrounding my garden. Over the years I have watched them nest, raise their chicks, avoid predators and engage in a variety of mating and chasing behaviours across my back lawn.

 

Live and Let Live

 

On the subject of predators; the back yard is the domain of my very old Abyssinian cat who, in years gone by, made sure that few birds settled on the lawn during his watch. Although curtailed by a harness and length of nylon cord he was still able to generate enough speed and leaping power to scare any bird that transgressed into his territory. Today, not so fast, and the doves know it and feed close to him. The occasional sortie in their direction is met with a flap of wings to gain some height then a quick return to the ground and feeding.

 

My Turf

 

Off you go

Just one more piece of seed

Sometimes, when feeding one dove will dominate the area charging at the others and seeing them off. However, the victims of this avian bullying quickly return and the perpetrator seems to expend more energy and get less seed than they do. I suspect the perps are males, enough said.   

 

Necessary maintenance

 

Another interesting Dove behaviour is resting in a sunny patch with one wing extended and feathers spread. Apparently, this helps the fine preening oil spread over the plumage and drives out parasites.

 

One of each kind

 

Spotted Doves are attractive birds that belong to the Columbidae family which includes pigeons. They are an introduced species. Several other kinds of birds belonging to this group are also quite common in the Adelaide area. They include: Feral pigeons or Rock Doves, Barbary or Turtle Doves and Crested Pigeons. These birds all have melodious calls and add to the diverse birdsong of our city.

 

 

Explore and enjoy your own environment and stay well and safe in these unusual times.

 

Cheers

Baz

 Please pass on this blog title and or contact information (URL) to any person or organisation with an interest in taking walks and enjoying wildlife in SA.

See more South Australian stories and pictures in Weekend Notes

https://www.weekendnotes.com/profile/651267/

 I have recently spent time in Africa and the link below will allow you to enjoy images and field notes describing some of my encounters with the wonderful wildlife of Botswana and Zambia. I will try to attach a new image and notes each month.

https://wildlifemomentssa.blogspot.com

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